New York, New York Day Five: Russian Princesses and Josh Groban

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Once again, I was speechless.

There I stood outside the Imperial Theater in my Natasha Rostov inspired outfit, preparing to see Natasha, Pierre, and The Great Comet of 1812.

The thing that most people don’t realize is that whatever the outfit you chose to wear to the theater may be, it will always influence, if not you directly, those around you. This is why I had decided that I needed to be as Rostovy as was earthly possible.

I think I achieved it pretty well.

The thing, though, and please don’t be offended if you’re totally this person, but the thing is, if you wear jeans and t-shirts to Broadway (or really any theater) it can be offsetting to those of us who take everything much, much too seriously. I live in a fantasy world where I’m perfectly elegant and about seventy percent royalty, do you really want to burst my bubble? I think some people don’t realize this and they might even (bless their hearts) think that going to the theater is the same thing as going to the movies.

*terrifying villain voice*

But they’re so, SO wrong.

Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812 was an absolute palooza of incredibleness. It was funny, and beautiful, and the set was very, very good.

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Because it is based on War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy, The Great Comet has a huge amount of things going on. Mostly scandal and poisoning, but bits can be hard to follow, if you, unlike me, do not have a Past. My past is slightly unfortunate in some aspects. I was what is known as a Know-It-All Nerd. Know-It-All Nerds sometimes run tech companies but sometimes they are also mildly difficult to live with. Just ask Squeak, my emotionally unstable guinea pig.*

Anyway, in my Know-It-All Nerd time I did many useful and frightening things, one of which was read War and Peace when I was in seventh grade. People are very receptive of that sort of thing. I coasted on Reading War and Peace Acclaim for, like, six months. Sometimes, admittedly, I still pull it out when I need something useful and relatable to chat with people with.

In any case, I was able to follow the plot of The Great Comet rather well because of my Past and I really, really enjoyed it. Also: the costumes were very lovely and the score is beautiful: it is sung through, with some third person narration done by the characters too and Josh Groban and Denee Benton were fantastic in the title roles of Pierre and Natasha. I won’t spoil the plot for you, but it is about high society in Russia in the early nineteenth century during the French Invasion of Russia. It was all very dramatical, which is usually the only thing that matters.

Now. There is one thing I have wanted to do my entire life. It is known as Stage Door. After every show on Broadway, people gather by the stage door and sometimes the actresses and actors come out and sign programs and take photos and you can meet them. Does that sound like the greatest thing ever, or what? I know! And friends, I, Broadway Lil, was able to Stage Door The Great Comet. Not only that, though, but because all the theaters are so freaking close to each other I bopped over to Dear Evan Hansen and saw LAURA DREYFUSS and also raced over to Hamilton, found a playbill somehwhere or other, and got it signed! I almost didn’t make it through, it was so exciting!

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I also got my Great Comet Playbill signed by so many people, including Josh Groban. Do you think I would kid you about something this serious? Josh freaking GROBAN!

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What is life.

New York is so alive during the night, I would have stayed out until morning if I could have. There are, admittedly, some side-effects to seeing great theatre. Now how can I continue if I’m not a fabulously wealthy Russian princess?! You tell me.

Love,

Lil

xoxo

 

*I should have named him Enjolras or something good like that, but what’s done is done.

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